Digital Economy Bill

To take action, enter your postcode in the box below and click ‘Take Action’
    

The Digital Economy Bill Gives the MP’s the power to force the Internet Service Provider to cut your internet off anywhere pubs, cafes, work, home if someone is accused of illegally downloading too many times, even if it’s not you personally downloading. You will still be prosecuted even if your connection was hacked.

What does this mean for you?

This mean if you are accused of downloading copyrighted material 3 times even if to the best of your knowledge nobody in your household has downloaded these, your internet connection will be disconnected.

What does this mean for the centre?

If the law is passed we will have to put into place certain measures and precautions to protect us from been sued. The precautions will cost money to put into place, thus we may have to charge a fee once again for using the computers.

What does this mean for Internet based companies?

Sites such as YouTube UK could be forced offline for knowingly hosting copyright infringing content. YouTube knows they host it but can’t keep track of the 20minutes of video uploaded every second so they really on people telling them where it is been liable for hosting content, no more safe harbour (or at least not defined in the bill).
The Digital Economy Bill in its current form risks impacting the innovation sector of the UK’s digital economy in unintended and wholly negative ways.
The Digital Economy Bill bizarrely risks choking innovation in the long term, actually leading to a less innovative digital economy and thus less copyright to actually protect. It currently very narrowly protects a slice of “traditional” IP in a way that unintentionally damages future innovation and thus the UK’s fast-growing digital economy. While patent and copyright are important and remain relevant to the UK’s creative economy, we believe the future Digital Economy is best served by policy which removes barriers to fast innovation, not old-fashioned protectionism.
The DE Bill in its current form will stifle innovation specifically preventing innovative UK businesses from participating in the revolution of social media, particularly as regards innovative British businesses engaged in user generated content.
Furthermore, the DE Bill’s current approach to WiFi will have a profoundly retrograde effect on the ability of British businesses to innovate. Businesses providing Wi-Fi services will be left open to penalties for copyright infringement making it impossible for them to offer these services and thus compete in the digital economy.
Specifically under Clause 18 of the Bill, the terms “reasonable steps” remain undefined and even if a business does everything it can to lock down its networks there remains no guarantee that it will not be held liable for traffic which is deemed to infringe copyright.
Clause 18 means that any business which provides Internet access for it staff will end up being defined as an “operator” (”a person or persons in joint or sole control of the decisions to make content accessible at or via an online location”). An online location is defined as “a location on the internet, a mobile data network or other data network at or via which copyright infringing content is accessible.” Boiled down, this simply means Internet access.
Placing the liability for civil copyright infringement on an internet account rather than an infringing individual will profoundly affect their ability to innovate and compete in the globalised digital economy.

Who is against the Bill?

The European Union • Google • Talk Talk • BT • Yahoo • Facebook • Channel Vee • eBay • TechCrunch • Coadec (The Coalition For A Digital Economy) • Open Rights Group • EFF (Electronic Frontier Foundation) • Stephen Fry as well as over 30,000 people who signed the Petition

What can I do?

You can help by writing to your MP urging them to stop the Government rushing the bill through. It’ll take you less than 2 minutes. Just enter your postcode above (so we can find your MP) and click “Take Action” to get started, we have even prepared a letter for you.
You can also sign a petition here



To take action, enter your postcode in the box below and click ‘Take Action’
    

The Digital Economy Bill Gives the MP’s the power to force the Internet Service Provider to cut your internet off anywhere pubs, cafes, work, home if someone is accused of illegally downloading too many times, even if it’s not you personally downloading. You will still be prosecuted even if your connection was hacked.

What does this mean for you?

This mean if you are accused of downloading copyrighted material 3 times even if to the best of your knowledge nobody in your household has downloaded these, your internet connection will be disconnected.

What does this mean for the centre?

If the law is passed we will have to put into place certain measures and precautions to protect us from been sued. The precautions will cost money to put into place, thus we may have to charge a fee once again for using the computers.

What does this mean for Internet based companies?

Sites such as YouTube UK could be forced offline for knowingly hosting copyright infringing content. YouTube knows they host it but can’t keep track of the 20minutes of video uploaded every second so they really on people telling them where it is been liable for hosting content, no more safe harbour (or at least not defined in the bill).
The Digital Economy Bill in its current form risks impacting the innovation sector of the UK’s digital economy in unintended and wholly negative ways.
The Digital Economy Bill bizarrely risks choking innovation in the long term, actually leading to a less innovative digital economy and thus less copyright to actually protect. It currently very narrowly protects a slice of “traditional” IP in a way that unintentionally damages future innovation and thus the UK’s fast-growing digital economy. While patent and copyright are important and remain relevant to the UK’s creative economy, we believe the future Digital Economy is best served by policy which removes barriers to fast innovation, not old-fashioned protectionism.
The DE Bill in its current form will stifle innovation specifically preventing innovative UK businesses from participating in the revolution of social media, particularly as regards innovative British businesses engaged in user generated content.
Furthermore, the DE Bill’s current approach to WiFi will have a profoundly retrograde effect on the ability of British businesses to innovate. Businesses providing Wi-Fi services will be left open to penalties for copyright infringement making it impossible for them to offer these services and thus compete in the digital economy.
Specifically under Clause 18 of the Bill, the terms “reasonable steps” remain undefined and even if a business does everything it can to lock down its networks there remains no guarantee that it will not be held liable for traffic which is deemed to infringe copyright. Clause 18 means that any business which provides Internet access for it staff will end up being defined as an “operator” (”a person or persons in joint or sole control of the decisions to make content accessible at or via an online location”). An online location is defined as “a location on the internet, a mobile data network or other data network at or via which copyright infringing content is accessible.” Boiled down, this simply means Internet access.
Placing the liability for civil copyright infringement on an internet account rather than an infringing individual will profoundly affect their ability to innovate and compete in the globalised digital economy.

Who is against the Bill?

The European Union • Google • Talk Talk • BT • Yahoo • Facebook • Channel Vee • eBay • TechCrunch • Coadec (The Coalition For A Digital Economy) • Open Rights Group • EFF (Electronic Frontier Foundation) • Stephen Fry as well as over 30,000 people who signed the Petition

What can I do?

You can help by writing to your MP urging them to stop the Government rushing the bill through. It’ll take you less than 2 minutes. Just enter your postcode above (so we can find your MP) and click “Take Action” to get started, we have even prepared a letter for you.You can also sign a petition here